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Review: Quantum Teens Are Go #1
Nikki  |  February 21, 2017

Review: Quantum Teens Are Go #1
Some teens want to be jocks, some want to be on stage, while others… others want to build time machines or space ships. Magdalene Vissagio (Kim and Kim) and Eryk Donovan (Memetic, Cognetic) are bringing out just such an adventure starring two fun-loving teens Sumesh and Nat, as they deal with break-ins and bullies and the quantum unknown. 
This was a blind buy for me. I’m familiar with both Visaggio and Donovan’s previous work and that’s all I needed to know (along with title) to pick up the issue. Sumesh and Nat are really sweet and interesting leads and I really love that connection they have because Visaggio frames it authentically. They’re young and in love with each other and science. Nat and Sumesh are on a mission to prove themselves to the underground science community (some real tough science punk rockers) and they'll go through lengths to reach their goal. Like with most first issues, this serves as set-up and introduction but Visaggio has a handle on making these necessary plot elements interesting. Part of that is because the two leads are likeable and relatable. (Have I mentioned I loved banter? Because I love banter and these two have it in spades.) My one critique would be the plot’s sudden jump at the end. The pacing felt off and rushed. There was a moment where I had to go back and see if I missed a page. Such things tend to happen in first issues though and I hope that it feels less rush in future issues.
Donovan’s art style is purposefully rough with heavier lines but it works with the story’s tone and with the indie feel to the book. It almost reminds me of Jeff Lemire’s art but with darker lines and less painted colours. I think style works most with the more action heavy scenes as it seemed like the quieter scenes were less consistent in quality.
Overall, this was a very fun first issue. Although it’s a new comic with brand new characters, Visaggio and Donovan have a handle on how much to reveal about the world and its characters in an authentic and organic way but the rushed ending makes me wonder how the rest of the comic will play ou

Some teens want to be jocks, some want to be on stage, while others… others want to build time machines or space ships. Magdalene Vissagio (Kim and Kim) and Eryk Donovan (Memetic, Cognetic) are bringing out just such an adventure starring two fun-loving teens Sumesh and Nat, as they deal with break-ins and bullies and the quantum unknown.

This was a blind buy for me. I’m familiar with both Visaggio and Donovan’s previous work and that’s all I needed to know (along with title) to pick up the issue. Sumesh and Nat are really sweet and interesting leads and I really love that connection they have because Visaggio frames it authentically. They’re young and in love with each other and science. Nat and Sumesh are on a mission to prove themselves to the underground science community (some real tough science punk rockers) and they'll go through lengths to reach their goal. Like with most first issues, this serves as set-up and introduction but Visaggio has a handle on making these necessary plot elements interesting. Part of that is because the two leads are likeable and relatable. (Have I mentioned I loved banter? Because I love banter and these two have it in spades.)

My one critique would be the plot’s sudden jump at the end. The pacing felt off and rushed. There was a moment where I had to go back and see if I missed a page. Such things tend to happen in first issues though and I hope that it feels less rush in future issues.

Donovan’s art style is purposefully rough with heavier lines but it works with the story’s tone and with the indie feel to the book. It almost reminds me of Jeff Lemire’s art but with darker lines and less painted colours. I think style works most with the more action heavy scenes as it seemed like the quieter scenes were less consistent in quality.

Overall, this was a very fun first issue. Although it’s a new comic with brand new characters, Visaggio and Donovan have a handle on how much to reveal about the world and its characters in an authentic and organic way but the rushed ending makes me wonder how the rest of the comic will play out.

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